Immigration authorities may decide to refuse your request to enter the country if you are subject to criminal process (facing charges) or have been convicted of a serious crime as defined by national laws on criminal matters or provisions in international treaties or conventions that the Mexican State is party to. You may also be refused entry if your background in Mexico or abroad could compromise national or public security, per Article 43 of the Migration Law.

According to Article 194 of the Federal Code on Criminal Proceedings, serious crimes include all crimes that have a significant, negative effect on the fundamental values of society.

Serious crimes include, among others: manslaughter; terrorism and international terrorism; sabotage; piracy; genocide; prison break; attacks on public thoroughfares; drug-related crimes; corruption of minors; child pornography; exploitation of minors; falsifying and counterfeit of currency; rape; highway robbery; trafficking in minors; trafficking in undocumented persons; aggravated robbery; vehicular theft; extortion; crimes against the environment, committed with intent; forced disappearance of persons; bearing arms reserved for the exclusive use of the Army, Navy or Air Force; smuggling into the country firearms not reserved for the exclusive use of the Army, Navy or Air Force; smuggling and comparable crimes, and; tax fraud and comparable crimes.