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Visitor Visa

Holders of valid NZ Passports do not require a visa if they are travelling to Mexico for less than 180 days for tourism.

An entry tax of US$20.00 must be paid at the port of entry by those arriving by land or sea. Those entering the country by air will already have paid this tax as part of their airfare.

Mexican immigration authorities may ask for proof of solvency (bank statements or a credit card), hotel bookings or your return ticket.

If you are not a New Zealand passport holder, please check whether or not you require a visa by visiting the links below:

·         Countries and regions that require a visa to enter Mexico:

http://www.inm.gob.mx/gobmx/word/index.php/paises-requieren-visa-para-mexico/

·         Countries and regions that DO NOT require a visa to enter Mexico:

http://www.inm.gob.mx/gobmx/word/index.php/paises-no-requieren-visa-para-mexico/

If you are holding a passport that requires a visa, please note the requirements for the issuing of a Tourist Visa are the following:

·         Valid passport

·         Visa or permit that you are in New Zealand under.

·         1 passport photograph

·         Proof of economic solvency (bank statements from the last three months with an average monthly balance of at least 2,500 NZD, OR payment slips of the last three months and a letter of your employer stating that you’ve been working for that particular company for at least one year.

·         If you are currently studying in NZ, proof of enrolment at a university/school and a monthly income of the last three months (salary, allowances, pension or scholarship). The monthly income for students must be over $500 NZD.

If you have met all the requirements, e-mail a scanned copy of these in an e-mail to Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo.  and request an appointment. Once the appointment date has been set, you will need to bring all these documents in originals on the day of the appointment.

 

Visa exemptions:

If you have a valid multiple entry visa, or you are a permanent resident from the United States, Canada, Japan, UK or any country of the Schengen space, you can enter Mexico for up to 180 days without a Mexican Visitor Visa, as long as you do not work in Mexico.

The Mexican Embassy reserves the right not to issue a visa if the requirements are met or the individual is not considered suitable to be issued a visa.

Ultimately, it is the decision of the immigration officer to allow or refuse entrance to Mexico, even if you carry with you a valid visa.

 

 

 

Temporary Resident Visa

 

A temporary resident visa is the first step if you want to stay in Mexico more than 180 days and less than 4 years.

The visa is valid for six months and includes one entry. Once the applicant arrives in Mexico, it is mandatory to present the Temporary Resident Visa at the INM (National Institute of Migration) within the first 30 days of arrival, in order to request a Temporary Resident Card, valid for a period of time from 6 months to 4 years.

temporary resident visa does NOT allow the visa holder to work in Mexico, unless a working permit has been previously authorized by the INM. 

 

General requirements:

·         Valid passport

·         One passport size photograph, white background

·         NZ Visa, for non-New Zealand citizens.

 

One of the following options, depending on your situation:

A)     Proof of economic solvency:

-          Option 1: Bank statements for the last 12 months, with a monthly average of 30,000 NZD

-          Option 2: Proof of steady income for the last 6 months, with a monthly average of 2,500 NZD

 

B)    Familiar Unity

-          Official ID of the Mexican citizen or Resident of Mexico. The person must be physically present at the Embassy during the appointment.

-          Economic solvency, 600 NZD per family member sponsored.

-          One of the following:

o   For spouses: marriage certificate

o   For parents: Birth certificate of the Mexican citizen or Resident.

o   For minors: Birth certificate of the applicant

o   For children of spouses: Birth certificate of the applicant and marriage certificate of the spouse.

 

 

C)     Scientific investigation in Mexican waters

-          Letter by which the diplomatic representation in Mexico confirms that the Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs has received the authorisation by the national authorities for the scientific/research activities in Mexican waters. The letter must contain full name and nationality of the applicant, name of the organisation, information about activities/projects and estimated length of the activity.

 

D)    Invitation from an organisation or an institution.

-          Invitation letter to participate in an unpaid activity in Mexico, with the following information:

o   Full name and nationality of the applicant

o   Name of the organisation or institution, full address, contact information, registration number and purpose of the organisation.

o   Activities and estimated duration

o   The binding responsibility to cover living expenses of the applicant

o   Copy of the official ID of the person who signs the responsive letter

-          Documents providing proof of applicant’s skills to perform such activities

-          If the organisation will cover the applicant’s expenses, proof of economic solvency. Except for institutions for the National Education System.

-          If the organisation will not cover the expenses, economic solvency from the applicant.

 

E)     Ownership of real estate in Mexico

-          Public deed for a property valued at least 4’000,000 Mexican pesos (roughly 320,000 NZD) 

 

F)     Investor

-          Proof of participation in the capital stock of a Mexican legal entity (deed or policy), with a share of at least 2’000,000 Mexican pesos (roughly 170,000 NZD)

-          Proof of the ownership of personal property or fixed assets in Mexico, with a value of at least 2’000,000 Mexican pesos.

-          Proof of the development of economic or business activities in Mexico, with documents such as contracts, invoices, receipts, or proof issued by the IMSS proving that the company in Mexico is an employer of at least three workers.

 

 

Student Visa

New Zealand nationals do not need to apply for a visa to study or do academic research in Mexico, as long as the stay is no longer than 180 days.

If you are planning to study in Mexico for more than 6 months, then you will need to apply for a Student Visa. Please request an appointment at Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo.

Requirements

 

o             Passport valid for at least one year from the intended

              date of entry

 

o             1 photograph (passport size)

 

o             Proof of migration status in New Zealand (if applicable)

 

o             Letter of acceptance from the School, University or Academic Institution, showing

              applicant’s full name, name of the course, level, starting and finishing date, fees

              and contact details and information of the Academic Institution

 

o             Proof of solvency- one of the following must be provided to demonstrate that the

applicant will have sufficient funds to cover return airfares and expenses while in Mexico. If the applicant is under 25 years old, financial solvency can be accounted   or by his/her parents.

 

 

v  bank statements (savings or other) of the past 3 months with the equivalent of at least 10,000 Mexican pesos (roughly 800 NZD) monthly average from a steady employment, a monthly pension or scholarship

v  proof of investments or bank accounts with an average monthly balance equivalent of 100,000 Mexican pesos (8,000 NZD) of the past 3 months.

Applicants will be asked to make an appointment for a personal interview at the Embassy in Wellington. If the interviewee is successful in his/her application, the migratory form will be ready for collection later that same day.

 

 

Working Holiday visa for New Zealanders

 

This visa allows New Zealanders between 18 to 30 years old to work and visit Mexico for one year. Participants may not work for the same employer for a period longer than three months. They are granted with a Temporary Resident Visa and they need to find a job offer before applying for a work permit at the National Institute of Migration in Mexico. They may participate in one training or study course of up to three months in length.

 

Applicants must send all of the following documents scanned to the following mail: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo.

 

o             First page of New Zealand passport valid for at least one year from the intended date of entry.

o             Signed letter describing main activities and planned destinations while travelling in Mexico.

o             Medical insurance policy, including comprehensive allowance, valid for at least one year from the intended date of entry.

o             Proof of solvency- one of the following must be provided to demonstrate that the applicant will have sufficient funds to cover return airfares and expenses while in Mexico:

o             a current account statement (savings or other) of the past 12 months with at least 900NZD monthly average;

o             a credit card statement showing credit limit (at least 1,500 NZD);

 

Once the aforementioned documents are received and reviewed in the Embassy, applicants will be asked to make an appointment for a personal interview with a consular officer at the Embassy in Wellington.

 

If the interviewee is successful in his/her application, the migratory form will be ready for collection later that same day.

 

 

Traveling to Mexico with a criminal conviction

Immigration authorities may decide to refuse the request to enter the country if the applicant is subject to criminal process or has been convicted of a serious crime as defined by national laws on criminal matters or provisions in international treaties or conventions that the Mexican State is party to, or if the applicant’s background in Mexico or abroad could compromise national or public security. The decision is made by the Immigration officer at the border, and there is no process that will guarantee you entry.

According to Article 194 of the Federal Code on Criminal Proceedings, serious crimes include all crimes that have a significant, negative effect on the fundamental values of society. Serious crimes include, among others: manslaughter; terrorism and international terrorism; sabotage; piracy; genocide; prison break; attacks on public thoroughfares; drug-related crimes; corruption of minors; child pornography; exploitation of minors; falsifying and counterfeit of currency; rape; highway robbery; trafficking in minors; trafficking in undocumented persons; aggravated robbery; vehicular theft; extortion; crimes against the environment, committed with intent; forced disappearance of persons; bearing arms reserved for the exclusive use of the Army, Navy or Air Force; smuggling into the country firearms not reserved for the exclusive use of the Army, Navy or Air Force; smuggling and comparable crimes, and; tax fraud and comparable crimes.

If you decide to go ahead with your travel it is understanding that individuals with criminal records must declare so at the point of entry and are subject to the decision made by Immigration authorities.