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Category: Visas Foreigners
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Requirements for foreign visitors who intend to enter and remain in Mexico as temporary residents for a period greater than 180 days and less than 4 years.

  1. Visa application form printed on one page, double sided, properly completed and signed.
  2. Valid passport or travel and identity document, original and a photocopy of the page containing the photograph and personal data.
  3. Original and a photocopy of the migratory document proving your legal migratory status in Canada (only for applicants who are not Canadian citizens).
  4. One photograph measuring 3.9 cm x 3.1 cm, face uncovered, no eyeglasses, frontal view, in colour, with white background.
  5. Payment of fees in cash for the processing of the visa application.

In addition, the following documents must be presented depending on the category applied for:

a) Economic solvency:

b) Scientific research in waters under Mexican jurisdiction:

c) Invitation from an organization or a public or private institution:

1. Original letter from a public or private organization or institution of renowned integrity inviting the foreigner to participate in a non-remunerated activity in Mexican territory. The letter must contain the following data:

  1. Full name and nationality of the applicant or interested party.
  2. Business or company name of the organization.
  3. Official registration number, if applicable.
  4. Purpose of the organization or private institution.
  5. Complete address and contact information for the organization or institution.
  6. Information on the activity to be conducted or the project in which the foreigner will participate. The foreigner’s activity must be related to the objectives of the inviting organization or institution.
  7. Estimated length or approximate end date of the activity to be undertaken.
  8. A statement of the binding responsibility to cover living expenses for the foreigner during his/her stay in Mexico, and to ensure the foreigner’s return to his/her country of origin or residence, and
  9. A copy of the official identification of the person signing the letter of invitation.

2. To prove that it has sufficient funds to comply with the binding responsibility referred to in section viii of the preceding numeral, the inviting organization or private institution will present the original and a photocopy of the investment receipts or bank statements showing an average monthly balance of $800,400.00 Mexican pesos or its equivalent of $55,308.00 Canadian dollars during the past twelve months. Public and private institutions belonging to the Mexican National Educational System do not need to prove economic solvency.

3. The foreigner must present the original and a photocopy of documents proving that s/he has the necessary experience, capacity, skills or expertise to develop the activity for which s/he has been invited.

4. In the event that the inviting institution will not cover living expenses:

  1. Original and a photocopy of investment receipts or bank statements showing an average monthly balance of $27,654.00 Canadian dollars during the past twelve months, or
  2. Original and a photocopy of documents showing that the applicant has employment or a pension with a monthly tax-free income greater than $1,106.00 Canadian dollars during the past six months.

d) Under the auspices of an international legal instrument governing mobility of people:

1. Written document in which the applicant presents his/her candidature to the Consular Office, indicating under which instrument the visa is being requested, in the original.

2. Compliance with each of the requirements set forth in the corresponding international legal instrument on mobility:

  1. Mexico-Canada Youth Mobility Program.
  2. Pacific Alliance Interinstitutional Agreement for a Working Vacation Program.

e) Family Unity:

Family Unity Applications can only be accepted at an Embassy or Consular Office if the Mexican citizen or foreigner with temporary or permanent resident status in Mexico is outside Mexico and accompanies the family member at the time the application is submitted. Family ties must be proven as follows:

1 - Ties with a foreigner who holds a temporary resident visa or temporary student resident visa:

i. If the applicant is the spouse or common-law partner of the foreigner holding a temporary resident or temporary student resident visa, ties can be demonstrated by a marriage certificate or common-law certificate or equivalent figure issued by a competent authority in conformity with the applicable legislation in the country where the legal ceremony took place, original and a photocopy; or

If the applicant has a foreign child who holds a temporary resident or temporary student resident visa, ties can be demonstrated by the birth certificate of the child, original and a photocopy; or

If the applicant has a foreign mother or father who holds a temporary resident or temporary student resident visa, provided that the applicant is a child, or an adolescent who has not married, or has been declared incompetent and under the foreign parent’s legal representation, ties can be demonstrated by the birth certificate of the applicant, original and a photocopy; or

If the applicant is the child of the spouse or common-law partner or equivalent figure of a foreigner who holds a temporary resident or temporary student resident visa, provided that the applicant is a child, or an adolescent who has not married, or has been declared incompetent and under the foreign parent’s legal representation, ties can be demonstrated by:

ii. Temporary resident or temporary student resident visa, original and a photocopy, and
iii. Economic solvency to support each of the family members during their stay in the country, may be proven with:

2 - Marriage or common-law relationship with a foreigner who holds a permanent resident visa:

i. Marriage certificate or common-law certificate or equivalent figure issued by a competent authority in conformity with the applicable legislation in the country where the legal ceremony took place, original and a photocopy;

ii. Permanent resident visa, valid and in force, original and a photocopy, and

iii. Economic solvency to support the spouse or common-law partner or equivalent figure during his/her stay in the country, may be proven with:

3 - Ties to a foreigner who holds the migratory status of temporary resident or temporary student resident:

i. If the applicant is the spouse or common-law partner of the foreigner whose migratory status is that of temporary resident or temporary student resident, ties can be demonstrated by a marriage certificate or common-law certificate or equivalent figure issued by a competent authority in conformity with the applicable legislation in the country where the legal ceremony took place, original and a photocopy; or

If the applicant has a foreign child whose migratory status is that of temporary resident or temporary student resident, ties can be demonstrated by the birth certificate of the child, original and a photocopy; or

If the applicant has a foreign mother or father whose migratory status is that of temporary resident or temporary student resident, provided that the applicant is a child, or an adolescent who has not married, or has been declared incompetent and under the foreign parent’s legal representation, ties can be demonstrated by the birth certificate of the applicant, original and a photocopy; or

If the applicant is the child of the spouse or common-law partner or equivalent figure of a foreigner whose migratory status is that of temporary resident or temporary student resident, provided that the applicant is a child, or an adolescent who has not married, or has been declared incompetent and under the foreign parent’s legal representation, ties can be demonstrated by:

ii. Temporary resident or temporary student resident card, original and a photocopy, and

iii. Should the applicant have ties to a foreigner whose status is that of temporary student resident:

4 - Marriage or common-law relationship or equivalent figure with a foreigner whose migratory status is that of permanent resident:

i. Marriage certificate or common-law certificate or equivalent figure issued by a competent authority in conformity with the applicable legislation in the country where the legal ceremony took place, original and a photocopy;

ii. Permanent resident card, valid and in force, original and a photocopy.

5 - Marriage or common-law relationship with a Mexican citizen:

i. Marriage certificate or common-law certificate or equivalent figure issued by a competent authority in conformity with the applicable legislation in the country where the legal ceremony took place, original and a photocopy; and

ii. Document proving Mexican nationality, original and a photocopy.

Requirements to Prove a Common-Law Relationship

A Common-Law Relationship is understood as being a relationship between a man and woman who live together outside the bonds of matrimony, in an ongoing and permanent fashion, for the period of time established by the legislation of the corresponding country. The couple does not need to have cohabited for the established term if there are children born of the union.

The applicant must present a Statutory Declaration or Affidavit signed before a Canadian Notary Public, stating that as of the date of the visa application the interested parties have cohabited publicly and continuously for a minimum of two years. This declaration must contain certified copies (certified by a Notary Public) of the official photo identification of the interested parties (passport, driver’s license), as well as documents demonstrating their common-law relationship (rental contract or financing to purchase a home signed jointly; joint property; joint bank or credit accounts; income tax return showing the common-law union; life insurance policy listing the common-law partner as beneficiary, etc.).

If the couple has children together, they should present the original birth certificate(s) of the child(ren). In this case, it is not necessary for the couple to have cohabited publicly and continuously for a minimum of two years. Nevertheless, they must show that they maintain a common residence by means of payment receipts for utilities issued under both names.

If the Statutory Declaration is signed before a Notary Public from a province outside the jurisdiction of the Representative Office carrying out the procedure, or outside the country, it must be legalized by the corresponding Mexican Embassy or Consulate. In the document is issued outside Canada, it must be apostilled or legalized, depending on the country.

f) Real Estate Property in Mexican territory:

  1. Original and a photocopy of the Public Deed signed before a Commissioner of Oaths certifying that the foreigner is the holder of real estate with a value exceeding $3,201,600.00 Mexican pesos or its equivalent of $221,231.00 Canadian dollars.

g) Investor:

1. Deed or policy from a Mexican corporation signed before a Commissioner of Oaths, or a document duly certified by the administrative body or a competent officer thereof, stating that the foreigner has shares in the capital stock of the Mexican corporation, and that the amount of the investment effectively disbursed for the foreigner’s share in the corporation would exceed $1,600,800.00 Mexican pesos or its equivalent of $110,615.00 Canadian dollars; this could be proven by a contract for the purchase of shares or stocks, contract for the transfer of assets or rights to the Mexican corporation, or a document issued by the corporation proving the amount contributed for shares in the capital stock, original and a photocopy;

2. Document proving the ownership of personal property by a foreign corporation, with a value exceeding $1,600,800.00 Mexican pesos or its equivalent of $110,615.00 Canadian dollars, original and a photocopy; or

3. Documentation proving the conducting of economic or business activities in Mexican territory, which could be proven by documents such as (but not limited to) contracts, service orders, invoices, receipts, business plans, licenses and permits, or a certificate issued by the Mexican Social Security Institute proving that the foreigner employs at least three workers, original and a photocopy.

Important Notes:

Issuance of the visa is subject to the result of the interview.

The visa may only be used during the period of validity, which begins on the date of issuance, and is valid for one single entry. Once you have entered Mexican territory, within the first 30 calendar days, you must go to the National Migration Institute to process the residence card that proves your legal status in the country and allows you to remain in Mexico.

In the case of Family Unity, if the supporting documents (birth certificate, marriage certificate or statutory declaration of common-law relationship signed before a notary public) are issued outside the jurisdiction of the Mexican representative office performing the procedure, the documents must be legalized by the corresponding Mexican Embassy or Consulate. If the documents are from a country other than Canada, they must be apostilled or legalized, depending on the country.

Residents who seek to conduct remunerated or philanthropic activities related to the practice of a profession or that require special authorization, must comply with the provisions of the applicable legislation on the subject and obtain authorization from the competent authorities.

Under no circumstances may the applicant apply for a visa for more than one spouse or common-law partner, even should the legislation of the other country allow for such. A second application would only possible upon proving to the consular office, by means of documents issued by a competent authority, that the previous relationship had been dissolved or terminated.

Immigration authorities may decide to refuse the request to enter the country if the applicant is subject to criminal process or has been convicted of a serious crime as defined by national laws on criminal matters or provisions in international treaties or conventions that the Mexican State is party to, or if the applicant’s background in Mexico or abroad could compromise national or public security, in accordance with Article 43 of the Migration Law.