Mexican Academy of Sciences
Press Release AMC/219/14
Mexico City, June 22, 2014


•    A symposium begins today in which scientific leaders of the three countries will study new horizons for science in the fields of astrophysics, biotechnology, green chemistry, marine science and disasters
•    Trade between the three countries has more than tripled and many of the economic gains can be attributed to NAFTA, however, this treaty did not foresee that science, technology transfer and innovation would play a fundamental role as key drivers of social and economic development in the world today


Academies of Sciences from Canada, the U.S. and Mexico are working to achieve the broadest possible cooperation among the three countries. As a first step, a joint symposium began today at Casa, the University of California’s mini-campus in Mexico City, involving the participation of young researchers in astrophysics, biotechnology, green chemistry, marine science, and the field of hazards and disasters. The academic session, which will conclude on June 24, consists of presentations from the next generation of scientific leaders.

The symposium entitled: New Horizons in Science, is organized by the Mexican Academy of Sciences, headed by José Franco; the Royal Society of Canada: The Academies of Arts, Humanities and Sciences of Canada, represented by Jeremy McNeil; and the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, headed by Michael T. Clegg.

According to the organizers, an important step in North American cooperation began with the Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which for over 20 years now has been geared toward increasing economic integration between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico. Certainly this treaty has achieved its objectives, as trade between the three countries has more than tripled from $290 billion in 1993 to more than $1.1 trillion in 2012.

While these achievements can be attributed to NAFTA, the organizers added, the treaty did not fully anticipate that science, technology transfer and innovation would play a fundamental role as the main drivers of social and economic development in the world today.

It has been estimated that over 50% of economic growth in the twentieth century can be traced to the fruits of scientific discovery. The three North American partners have strong scientific communities, and the three further benefit through close scientific cooperation that can lead to new technologies and solutions to the challenges of the 21st century.

They believe that new discoveries and inventions are powered by the open exchange of ideas and combining methods and knowledge from the various disciplines in novel, creative ways. Moreover, the challenges of the twenty-first century, such as climate change, can only be addressed with sound scientific knowledge applied at the international level.

Consequently, the academies of the three nations aim to work together to stimulate scientific exchange and focus on the next generation of scientific leaders, with the conviction that this is the most effective way to ensure a better future for each of the three countries.
The complete program can be consulted at: www.ianas.org/newhorizonsinscience/



The symposium "New Horizons in Science", is organized by Jeremy McNeil, Secretary of International Affairs of the Royal Society of Canada; José Franco, President of the Mexican Academy of Sciences; and Michael T. Clegg, Foreign Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States.
Photo: IAP, AMC and UCI.